Here’s a simple butterfly drill that incorporates a few wonderful aspects… relaxation and the opportunity to work on timing.

If you’ve ever seen any TV police drama, there will be a scene where the suspect is placed against the wall, hands high, and pressed forward so the police can search him. This position just happens to be a great example of the press on butterfly.

Through the history of swimming, there have been individuals who have proven alternative techniques really work. Mel Stewart and Robert Margalis are two great butterfly swimmers who use side breathing in fly, and you should at least try it too.

Ultimately, the sport of competitive swimming is about racing. Finding what skills, or weapons, work best for you in those races is key to winning.

We all know a good underwater dolphin kick is incredibly important in your butterfly. The question is… when do you start your kick?

To swim really fast butterfly, you have to take advantage of every opportunity for propulsion. The place that most swimmers ignore this opportunity… is in the second kick.

Butterfly – Hand Entry

How do your hands enter the water on butterfly? While it’s pretty common that they enter sweeping out, some swimmers are able to get their hands to hook as well as sweep, when they touch the water.

Butterfly – Breakout

Young, aggressive swimmers canʼt WAIT to start racing. Because of that, as coaches and teachers, we have to instruct them the best way to begin a race.

Butterfly – 3-3-3

Butterfly 3-3-3 is a simple drill that allows you to train fly longer, and keep your rhythm in check. We asked our friend McKenzie to demonstrate the drill (one of her favorites), and show how it’s helped her develop her butterfly.