Here’s a different take on a drill we did about 3 years ago. This shows there are many ways to do the same drill. While many people think you should breathe to the front on single-arm fly, that’s not going to get you the whole story.

It’s funny how we discover new things in swimming. Sometimes, when you’re looking at one thing, you discover something else. Just goes to show that we should always keep an open mind on EVERYTHING in swimming.

One of the most important actions to learn for competitive swimming is the underwater dolphin kick. Its usefullness was apparent at the recent World Championships, especially as we watched Michael Phelps shoot off all his turns.

Working on a solid dolphin kick usually requires a board, or the rigors of holding your breath and kicking under water. Here’s a drill that will help you develop a stronger kick, as well as allow you to work the core muscles.

Butterfly is the type of stroke that requires specific training. You need to swim ENOUGH butterfly to strengthen the specific muscles for the stroke. But if you train A LOT of butterfly, there’s a good chance that you will train yourself to have a slow stroke cadence, and this is not effective for racing. The question is: How do you learn to slam race-pace butterfly, especially early in the season?

Most swimmers strive for a low, sweeping arm recovery in butterfly. But sometimes it’s hard to know if you’ve actually ACHIEVED this type of recovery. Here’s a drill with a built-in – correct detector – your thumbs.

Sculling is a great skill to acquire for all swimmers, and specific sculling drills begins to build an awareness of how to use the hands at various places in each stroke.

Finding “fun” and interesting ways to keep practices intriguing for swimmers is partly what drills are all about. It’s even better when these drills tax the swimmers’ bodies so that physical conditioning is also impacted.