> All Strokes (Except Fly) - Tempo-Trainer Set | GoSwim TV

All Strokes (Except Fly) – Tempo-Trainer Set

Stroke count, stroke length, and glide are important in swimming, but the overriding KING of efficient swimming is rhythm. One of the best tools for developing a sense of rhythm is the Tempo Trainer by Finis. Here’s a fun, challenging set that uses the Tempo Trainer to help you develop a feel for how to maintain rhythm when fatigue sets in.

DESCRIBE THE IMAGEThis set is in three parts — back, breast, free. You start with a 200 backstroke pull, followed by 4 X 100 backstroke. Then you do the same thing with breaststroke… then with freestyle… for a total of 1800 yards. You will be using different settings on the TT throughout the set, so be sure you know how to use it before you start.

In the following description, I have included actual TT settings, just so you can get an idea for how the set should flow. These are settings that worked for me, but you will need to experiment to find what works best for YOU. Use the 200 pull to experiment, stopping every 25 to adjust the TT, if necessary, until you find a cadence that gives you a nice, easy, relaxed and LONG stroke.

As you swim the 100s, the first one will probably feel too relaxed and long. Stick with it. On the remaining 100s, as you shift to a faster cadence and as fatigue sets in, you will WISH you were back at your original cadence. On the final 25 of the 100s, you may even think that your TT is playing tricks with you and that it is changing all by itself. That’s fatigue setting in and making you want to chop your stroke. Fight the urge and stick to the beat!

Part #1: Backstroke
Set the Tempo Trainer at a relaxed cadence for backstsroke. [For example: 1:35.]
200 backstroke pull with pull buoy.

DESCRIBE THE IMAGE Now set the TT at a cadence that is :05 faster than on the pull. [E.g., 1:30.]
4 X 100 backstroke on a sendoff that gives you approximately 25 seconds rest. Descend time 1-4. [For example: 2:00 sendoff and 1:37…1:34…1:33…1:32.]
On each 100, notch up the TT cadence by :05. For example:
#1: TT at 1:30
#2: TT at 1:25
#3: TT at 1:20
#4: TT at 1:15
Don’t miss your sendoff! Change the TT quickly after you finish each 100.

Part #2: Breaststroke

Set the TT at a relaxed cadence for breaststroke. [For example: 1:85.]
With fins: 200 breaststroke arms with dolphin kick, sticking with the beep.

Now set the TT at :05 less than the pull cadence. [E.g., 1:80.]
4 X 100 breast on a sendoff that gives you approximately 30 seconds rest. Descend time 1-4. [For example: 2:00 sendoff and 1:33…1:32…1:31…1:29.]
On each 100, notch up the TT cadence by :05. For example:
#1: TT at 1:80
#2: TT at 1:75
#3: TT at 1:70
#4: TT at 1:65

Part #2 — breaststroke — may be the hardest part of the set. I had trouble hanging onto any cadence below 1:75. If you fail to hold form at a particular cadence, repeat that cadence for the next 100.

DESCRIBE THE IMAGEPart #3: Freestyle
Set TT at relaxed cadence for freestyle. [For example: 1:25.]
200 freestyle pull.

Now set the TT at :05 less than pull cadence.
4 X 100 free on a sendoff that gives you approximately 35 seconds rest. Descend time 1-4. [For example: 2:00 sendoff and 1:25…1:25…1:23…1:20.]
On each 100, notch up the cadence by :05. For example:
#1: TT at 1:20
#2: TT at 1:15
#3: TT at 1:10
#4: TT at 1:05

The set will teach you how to stay long even as fatigue sets in. It will also help reveal your optimum cadence. If you notch up the cadence, but find that you can’t swim any faster at the faster cadence, then the slower cadence my be better for you.