> Set of the Week - January 5, 2007 | GoSwim TV

Set of the Week – January 5, 2007

A new feature for GoSwim.tv will be the Set of the Week (SOTW). Our first Set of the Week is a quick-performance kick set. Ready? Go!

Basic Black & White:
10 x 100 breaststroke kick on 2:00

Technicolor:
This set is all about holding a steady pace for the designated number of 100s. The first four are to be held at a certain pace, the next three at a faster pace, the next two at an even faster pace, and the final 100 should be an all-out sprint kick.

In our practice, the first four 100s were to be held as close to 1:30 as possible. This was for the breaststroke swimmers. We like to use the Zura Sidekick board, and our standard practice with the Sidekick is to take one stroke into the wall, flip, and then leave the wall using one kick under water. This method was demonstrated in our December 2005 DOTW, Kick Flips.

100s 1-4 are to be held at 1:30 or better
100s 5-7 are to be held at 1:25 or better
100s 8-9 are to be held at 1:20 or better
100 #10 is all out, but the goal is under 1:15

When you know you’re going to descend a set all the way down to an ultra-fast time or effort, make sure you don’t overwork the first part of the set. Once you know your goal pace, or target, try to get as close to the times as possible. Learn to control your pace, and learn to feel how fast the water is moving past your body at each speed.

High Definition:
Another sensible trick is to PRESET the pace of the upcoming 100. For example, when you’re ready to go from a 1:30 pace to a 1:25 pace, set up the first 50 of your final 1:30 100, at the 1:25 pace. Sound confusing? Try this. If you’re setting up a consistent pace, you wont see huge drop-offs in pace from the first 50 to the second. So, a 1:30 100 will probably be done at about a :44 first 50, and :46 second 50. On your 4th 100, knowing that your 5th 100 needs to be a 1:25 pace, PRESET the pace, and take out the first 50 in about :41. Then, back off, relax, and rest up. A slower 2nd 50 won’t hurt your pace in this method, and you won’t be surprised by how fast you’ll need to take out the next 100.